delara news Delaware Amateur Radio Association, Delaware OH   VOL 37 NUMBER 9

Educational Outreach

Anthony Luscre, K8ZT Outreach to Maker & DIY Groups Recently I had an opportunity to present information on Amateur Radio to a group of teachers attending a Maker Summer Camp. To go along with my presentation, I developed a tri-fold brochure, with a one-page insert, to “market” Amateur Radio to them. You are welcome to download this brochure and/or insert to share with teachers and makers in your area. Here are the links- brochure and insert. Please remember I am always available as a resource for you or the educators you are working with. If I am unable to travel to your area of the state, I am just and email (k8zt@arrl.net) or phone call away. I am also available via Google Hangouts to do free video conferencing with teachers & their students or with your local radio club. 

From the Public Information

Coordinator

John Ross, KD8IDJ The Voice of Aladdin Hamfest in Columbus a few weeks ago yielded a lot of great stories and good news!!! HAMS HELPING HAMS Tom Delaney, W8WTD, Vice Director, ARRL Great Lakes Division, talked to the folks at the Ohio Section meeting on August 4th and said, what I thought, were two important points on amateur radio. First, that anyone with minimal knowledge of electronics can study independently and get a ham license. But that person may have trouble getting on the air or staying interested and may not have ever met another amateur radio operator. Tom also shared that when he was teaching ham radio classes at the end of the day he would open the ham shack to the students so they could get a better look and feel of ham radio in operation. They would also be able to talk to licensed hams and learn far more than they could ever expect to know. Pretty inspirational stuff to me because I know it’s true. There were three hams that inspired and influenced me into amateur radio. That interaction, the knowledge they shared, is still as important today and was over 60 years ago. When I was seven years old my best friends’ dad invited me into his basement ham shack while be helped tune up a pair walkie-talkies may dad and I built. Ford W. Benbow, N8DCF, showed me more that I could have ever imagined and helped me get my first license. He passed away before I could say THANKS, but his oldest son followed in his dad’s footsteps and today is still a licensed ham in the state of Washington. I reached out to Ford Junior last week and next month I’ll share that conversation with you. Back 2014 I wrote an article about Columbus ham Paul Herman, W8SF. Paul was 95 the last time I saw him and still an active operator. I met him when I was 10 when dad and I took our TV’s to his repair shop. I’ll never forget the experience, the sounds, flashing light and that unmistakable “electronic” smell that rolled out of every tube-based ham shack. Paul Herman was a radio man through and through. Paul quietly passed away last March after almost a century of amateur radio. I did get to thank him for the help he gave me, and I will always remember his influence. I know I’m a better ham today because he took the time to share a little ham radio. Then there was Clay Jenkins, W8HUE, an engineer and church going ham! We met in the sound room at church…both trying to fix and errant PA system that made Minsters sound like high pitched ducks…not a good sound for men of the cloth! Clay took me under his wing, into his shack and treated me to some of the finer things about amateur radio…contact around the world! His 70-foot tower and beam were impressive but not enough for my parents to let me put one up. He, too, passed away a couple of years ago but not before I could say THANKS. My whole point here is, first, Tom Delaney was right!... First Contract is as important as the ham license itself. Second, the more we share, help and pass along knowledge the better hams we’ll have and better our hobby will become. WOW! I’ve said a lot! Thanks Tom…I need to listen to you more often! …and now the great ending to this story. The Columbus hamfest produced at least one new ham…a friend and fellow Army Veteran (we served in the same unit) Dan Merrill now KE8KJX. I’m sure it wasn’t all me, but I do talk up ham radio at our monthly Veteran lunches (OK it was all me!). I also know there were other hams talking to and encouraging Dan to take the test. Congratulation Dan…welcome to Amateur Radio.