DELARANEWS

Section news

Tom Sly, WB8LCD

This is my first official “column” in my new position as OH Section Manager. Before all else, please join me in saying “Thank You” to Scott for his years of service as the OH Section Manager. Scott has spent a serious portion of his life serving the Amateur Radio community in this position and has left the OH Section in wonderful shape and with a good reputation. And if that’s not enough, Scott is now serving as the Vice Director of the Great Lakes Division, continuing to work on your behalf, for the betterment of the hobby. It’s our job to be worthy of Scott’s efforts, and I don’t doubt you all for a second in that effort. So here I am, in one day, stepping into what Scott has spent years creating. It’s a little bit like being hit by a bus! I hope to be up to speed soon, and Scott is certainly giving me a hand as I get acclimated. The past year (2020) has been strange. I’ve never lived through a Pandemic before, and I’m sure that’s true for the rest of you, too. I’ve never lived through a period of political unrest like we’ve seen. Sometimes it feels like the earth is just spinning of control! But the earth has been here long before me, and probably will remain long after me. And you. Looking back on this past year I think many of us felt just a bit paralyzed by the circumstances, hoping that if we just waited long enough, they would pass by. I can see now that that’s a “non-starter”. It’s our move. We can sit and wait, or we can make things happen. Lots of Ham Radio activities have been cancelled over the past year and into the new year. Things come up, and sometimes events need to be cancelled. But now as we’re moving into our second year of cancellations, we need to find alternatives. If we just keep cancelling without replacing, we’re dead. So, we need to get creative. Lot’s of you have found new alternatives in technologies such as ZOOM. Probably the number 1 alternative for many of our activities over this past year. As I continue to make visits with clubs around the sections, I’m going to be looking at how all of you exploit the different mediums we have to work with. If your club is doing something new and innovative, let me know so I can share that with the rest of us. One of the things that has been a constant drumbeat for the past 5 – 10 maybe even 20 years is that we have to get a younger base in the hobby. That’s truer now than ever, and although there are some things happening it seems to be slow, and it’s not “intentional”. If we want to attract a younger demographic into the hobby, we need to look attractive to that younger demographic. We need to change our image. If you ask the proverbial “Man on the Street” about Ham Radio, for the most part, he doesn’t recognize that it still exists, or he visualizes a bunch of “old guys” sitting in their basement talking to each other about the “Good old Days”. We’ve got two things we need to accomplish to change that image so that we will be an attractive option for a younger group to get involved with. Number one: WE have to be having fun with our hobby! That really shouldn’t be a tough objective, but, as we’re all getting older, it’s real easy to sit on that couch and be entertained. Ham Radio is a hobby that requires a personal involvement and participation to get the most out of it and have the most fun with it. ( I’m going to let someone else nag you about maintaining your health so that you are able to be an active participant in the hobby!) The huge advantage we have with Ham Radio is that we have so many different ways to have fun! I’ve always said that Ham Radio is many different hobbies within a hobby. First and foremost, get on the air and make some Q’s! Keep your two-meter rig on. Most new hams have a Technician class license, get a handi-talkie, plink the repeaters and find no one there to talk to! Instantly they have to wonder what they’ve gotten themselves into. Be someone’s first contact on the repeater! Welcome them into the hobby and let them know they made a good move by getting involved. Then lead them into all the other ways that you’re having fun: DX’ing, contesting, working digital modes, making satellite contacts, QRP operating, working with circuits and building equipment, experimenting with antennas, ATV, EmComm operations, fox-hunting, restoring vintage gear…. Ham Radio is much more exciting than just checking into the 2-meter net once a week! Get out there and have some FUN! Number two: we have to be more self-promoting about our hobby. All you PIO’s (official and unofficial) need to be getting the word out. Advertise your meetings, Advertise you activities. Then, send in a write up about how your meeting went, take pictures and write up (sort of like an “after action” report) and send that to your local newspaper, radio station, TV station. Put it on your personal Facebook page. The point is – get the information out there! And don’t expect that just because you send something it will be publicized. But every time you do send something, showing that we are an actual, viable organization with regular activities, they’ll start to take notice and our chances improve. How about the other local organizations? With our ham radio clubs we’re usually pretty specific about the types of topics we want our meeting speakers to talk about. Other organizations are more general in their nature. They want to know what’s going on in their communities. You – we – could fill a need they have for a program! Think in terms of the Lions Club, Church organizations. Everyone wants to get in front of the kids, how about starting with the Parent-Teacher organizations and showing them the educational benefits that ham radio can have for their kids? We need to use our creativity to get in front of the public so that WE can create the image of Ham Radio that we want them to have. So, it’s actually pretty simple. Get out there and have fun with your hobby! Let others know how much fun you’re having! It’s simple, but it requires action. Don’t be a couch potato.
DELARANews

Section news

Tom Sly, WB8LCD

This is my first official “column” in my new position as OH Section Manager. Before all else, please join me in saying “Thank You” to Scott for his years of service as the OH Section Manager. Scott has spent a serious portion of his life serving the Amateur Radio community in this position and has left the OH Section in wonderful shape and with a good reputation. And if that’s not enough, Scott is now serving as the Vice Director of the Great Lakes Division, continuing to work on your behalf, for the betterment of the hobby. It’s our job to be worthy of Scott’s efforts, and I don’t doubt you all for a second in that effort. So here I am, in one day, stepping into what Scott has spent years creating. It’s a little bit like being hit by a bus! I hope to be up to speed soon, and Scott is certainly giving me a hand as I get acclimated. The past year (2020) has been strange. I’ve never lived through a Pandemic before, and I’m sure that’s true for the rest of you, too. I’ve never lived through a period of political unrest like we’ve seen. Sometimes it feels like the earth is just spinning of control! But the earth has been here long before me, and probably will remain long after me. And you. Looking back on this past year I think many of us felt just a bit paralyzed by the circumstances, hoping that if we just waited long enough, they would pass by. I can see now that that’s a “non-starter”. It’s our move. We can sit and wait, or we can make things happen. Lots of Ham Radio activities have been cancelled over the past year and into the new year. Things come up, and sometimes events need to be cancelled. But now as we’re moving into our second year of cancellations, we need to find alternatives. If we just keep cancelling without replacing, we’re dead. So, we need to get creative. Lot’s of you have found new alternatives in technologies such as ZOOM. Probably the number 1 alternative for many of our activities over this past year. As I continue to make visits with clubs around the sections, I’m going to be looking at how all of you exploit the different mediums we have to work with. If your club is doing something new and innovative, let me know so I can share that with the rest of us. One of the things that has been a constant drumbeat for the past 5 – 10 maybe even 20 years is that we have to get a younger base in the hobby. That’s truer now than ever, and although there are some things happening it seems to be slow, and it’s not “intentional”. If we want to attract a younger demographic into the hobby, we need to look attractive to that younger demographic. We need to change our image. If you ask the proverbial “Man on the Street” about Ham Radio, for the most part, he doesn’t recognize that it still exists, or he visualizes a bunch of “old guys” sitting in their basement talking to each other about the “Good old Days”. We’ve got two things we need to accomplish to change that image so that we will be an attractive option for a younger group to get involved with. Number one: WE have to be having fun with our hobby! That really shouldn’t be a tough objective, but, as we’re all getting older, it’s real easy to sit on that couch and be entertained. Ham Radio is a hobby that requires a personal involvement and participation to get the most out of it and have the most fun with it. ( I’m going to let someone else nag you about maintaining your health so that you are able to be an active participant in the hobby!) The huge advantage we have with Ham Radio is that we have so many different ways to have fun! I’ve always said that Ham Radio is many different hobbies within a hobby. First and foremost, get on the air and make some Q’s! Keep your two-meter rig on. Most new hams have a Technician class license, get a handi-talkie, plink the repeaters and find no one there to talk to! Instantly they have to wonder what they’ve gotten themselves into. Be someone’s first contact on the repeater! Welcome them into the hobby and let them know they made a good move by getting involved. Then lead them into all the other ways that you’re having fun: DX’ing, contesting, working digital modes, making satellite contacts, QRP operating, working with circuits and building equipment, experimenting with antennas, ATV, EmComm operations, fox-hunting, restoring vintage gear…. Ham Radio is much more exciting than just checking into the 2-meter net once a week! Get out there and have some FUN! Number two: we have to be more self-promoting about our hobby. All you PIO’s (official and unofficial) need to be getting the word out. Advertise your meetings, Advertise you activities. Then, send in a write up about how your meeting went, take pictures and write up (sort of like an “after action” report) and send that to your local newspaper, radio station, TV station. Put it on your personal Facebook page. The point is – get the information out there! And don’t expect that just because you send something it will be publicized. But every time you do send something, showing that we are an actual, viable organization with regular activities, they’ll start to take notice and our chances improve. How about the other local organizations? With our ham radio clubs we’re usually pretty specific about the types of topics we want our meeting speakers to talk about. Other organizations are more general in their nature. They want to know what’s going on in their communities. You – we – could fill a need they have for a program! Think in terms of the Lions Club, Church organizations. Everyone wants to get in front of the kids, how about starting with the Parent-Teacher organizations and showing them the educational benefits that ham radio can have for their kids? We need to use our creativity to get in front of the public so that WE can create the image of Ham Radio that we want them to have. So, it’s actually pretty simple. Get out there and have fun with your hobby! Let others know how much fun you’re having! It’s simple, but it requires action. Don’t be a couch potato.