DELARANEWS

ARES

Stan Broadway, N8BHL Ohio SEC, Delaware EC

Ironman coming right up! The largest and most intense event on our annual schedule is coming up at the end of July- the Ironman 70.3. This is a massive undertaking for the Delaware community. Over 2,000 competitors bring nearly 10,000 support and spectators into our area for the weekend event leading up to the July 25th competition. Competitors swim 1.5 miles, immediately bicycle 56 miles, then run a half marathon of 13 miles before the finish. Hub of the activity is Selby Stadium. The swim event takes place at Delaware Lake State Park. Bicycling takes a course up 23 and 98, across Marion County into a bit of Morrow County, then back downtown to Selby for the transition to running. It’s quite a site! Planning is much easier now that we have several of these under our belts, but just the same meetings started at the beginning of the year to make sure we were “on course” for a great event. Amateur Radio factors large in this event! We have spotters at the lake, and Marion ARES takes up the chase watching the bicycle course back to about Ashley, where Delaware ARES takes up the responsibilities. We also monitor the run course. So as you can see, this is an “all hands” event. We need YOU to help out with all this! If you haven’t signed up drop me an email. There is also a signup page for volunteers at https://ironman.volunteerlocal.com/volunteer/?id=51844 MAKE SURE YOU CHECK “HAM RADIO HOSTED BY DELAWARE COUNTY ARES.” You probably don’t want to sign up as a contestant. Even if you sign here, drop me an email or sign up at a meeting to make sure we know you’re “in”! Training is back! We held our first in-person training last month, and I was grateful to all who showed up to learn more about Ironman. We have changed our training to the FIRST THURSDAY of the month. ARES District 7 is holding a D7 net (or meeting) on the second Thursday now so I don’t want to be in conflict. We need to catch up on our training levels! Always glad to have you attend! Ohio ARES There are some nice things about living in Ohio- almost no wildfires, probably no earthquakes, and oboy, (except for 2009) no hurricanes! That doesn’t mean we can disregard all those threats but a well-executed emergency plan will help us all get through whatever we have to face. I bring this up because I was able to talk to the National Hurricane Convention via Zoom recently. This all-day session was held for amateur radio operators to review last year’s activity and share suggestions for this year’s season. As part of the Hurricane Watch Net, I am one of about 40 net control operators around the Atlantic Basin. The Director of the National Hurricane Center, himself a licensed ham, was there to let us know they are still great cheerleaders for ham radio. We are able to provide ground truth that they have no other way of getting… and some of our reports have caused them to change forecast positions and save lives. Why do we continue HF nets through noisy static, listening to dead air for hours waiting on that one report? After all, there’s the Internet… Sat phones…Cell service…even FAXes for Pete’s sake. But then we realize that (using a lot of common sense!) officials on islands actually shut all power down prior to the storm so that wind damaged electrified wires won’t fry people coming out after the storm passes. And that leaves…you guessed it… the oldest form of international communication for the win. The very thing that makes ham radio important in the aftermath of “the Big One” is what makes us important here at home. Ham operators should have the ability to cobble together an antenna, or temporarily repair one, find alternate power and get a radio on the air. Consider the kind of threat we need to overcome in Ohio. Obviously tornado outbreaks with damage and power loss, derecho winds, Winter storms, Blizzards, and yes even a potential earthquake. Any of these can result in extended power loss which would bring communication failure. So are you ready? Can you solder a coax connector, create an antenna with some wire (468 divided by freq in MHz… ) and find a bettery or alternate power source? Your community could be depending on you to do just that! It was interesting that we on the various hurricane nets face the same issue that we here in Ohio ARES face: where are all the people? Like most community service organizations ARES has seen a slight drop in active volunteers. We still have great numbers registered, but for many reasons those with the time, ability, health and willingness to deploy even for exercises has dropped. And a year sitting in our recliners with masks on our faces hasn’t helped. The good news is we’re seeing ARES activities starting to take off again, and with that some of the excitement of actually doing ‘stuff’ has resurfaced. I would like to invite you back into ARES to participate! If you’ve “been there done that” for twenty years, your expertise and skill is something to be passed on to the next generation! If you’re unsure that you want to try this stuff, jump on in! You’ll be welcomed, and you’ll be able to pick up on the training and skill that will make you a better all-around ham operator! So get involved- get trained, and stay in practice. There are a lot of critical events that happen fast and won’t give you time to prepare.

Amateur Radio is more than

a hobby- it becomes an

important service when

other forms of

communication fail. It’s up

to all of us to stay ready,

stay trained, and stay

available. We could be

required on a moment’s

notice.

Delaware County ARES is part of the national ARRL program. We rely on our volunteers. We operate during several large public events including the national-level Ironman competition. We hold a radio net on the 145.19 repeater (no tone) on the first Thursday of every month at 8PM. We hold a training meeting on the second Thursday of every month at 7:30 usually at the Red Cross building. All amateurs are invited! For information, contact Stan, N8BHL the Delaware County Emergency Coordinator, or Joe, K8MP or Craig, W8CR.
DELARANews

ARES

Stan Broadway, N8BHL Ohio SEC,

Delaware EC

Ironman coming right up! The largest and most intense event on our annual schedule is coming up at the end of July- the Ironman 70.3. This is a massive undertaking for the Delaware community. Over 2,000 competitors bring nearly 10,000 support and spectators into our area for the weekend event leading up to the July 25th competition. Competitors swim 1.5 miles, immediately bicycle 56 miles, then run a half marathon of 13 miles before the finish. Hub of the activity is Selby Stadium. The swim event takes place at Delaware Lake State Park. Bicycling takes a course up 23 and 98, across Marion County into a bit of Morrow County, then back downtown to Selby for the transition to running. It’s quite a site! Planning is much easier now that we have several of these under our belts, but just the same meetings started at the beginning of the year to make sure we were “on course” for a great event. Amateur Radio factors large in this event! We have spotters at the lake, and Marion ARES takes up the chase watching the bicycle course back to about Ashley, where Delaware ARES takes up the responsibilities. We also monitor the run course. So as you can see, this is an “all hands” event. We need YOU to help out with all this! If you haven’t signed up drop me an email. There is also a signup page for volunteers at https://ironman.volunteerlocal.com/volunteer/?id=5 1844 MAKE SURE YOU CHECK “HAM RADIO HOSTED BY DELAWARE COUNTY ARES.” You probably don’t want to sign up as a contestant. Even if you sign here, drop me an email or sign up at a meeting to make sure we know you’re “in”! Training is back! We held our first in-person training last month, and I was grateful to all who showed up to learn more about Ironman. We have changed our training to the FIRST THURSDAY of the month. ARES District 7 is holding a D7 net (or meeting) on the second Thursday now so I don’t want to be in conflict. We need to catch up on our training levels! Always glad to have you attend! Ohio ARES There are some nice things about living in Ohio- almost no wildfires, probably no earthquakes, and oboy, (except for 2009) no hurricanes! That doesn’t mean we can disregard all those threats but a well- executed emergency plan will help us all get through whatever we have to face. I bring this up because I was able to talk to the National Hurricane Convention via Zoom recently. This all-day session was held for amateur radio operators to review last year’s activity and share suggestions for this year’s season. As part of the Hurricane Watch Net, I am one of about 40 net control operators around the Atlantic Basin. The Director of the National Hurricane Center, himself a licensed ham, was there to let us know they are still great cheerleaders for ham radio. We are able to provide ground truth that they have no other way of getting… and some of our reports have caused them to change forecast positions and save lives. Why do we continue HF nets through noisy static, listening to dead air for hours waiting on that one report? After all, there’s the Internet… Sat phones…Cell service…even FAXes for Pete’s sake. But then we realize that (using a lot of common sense!) officials on islands actually shut all power down prior to the storm so that wind damaged electrified wires won’t fry people coming out after the storm passes. And that leaves…you guessed it… the oldest form of international communication for the win. The very thing that makes ham radio important in the aftermath of “the Big One” is what makes us important here at home. Ham operators should have the ability to cobble together an antenna, or temporarily repair one, find alternate power and get a radio on the air. Consider the kind of threat we need to overcome in Ohio. Obviously tornado outbreaks with damage and power loss, derecho winds, Winter storms, Blizzards, and yes even a potential earthquake. Any of these can result in extended power loss which would bring communication failure. So are you ready? Can you solder a coax connector, create an antenna with some wire (468 divided by freq in MHz… ) and find a bettery or alternate power source? Your community could be depending on you to do just that! It was interesting that we on the various hurricane nets face the same issue that we here in Ohio ARES face: where are all the people? Like most community service organizations ARES has seen a slight drop in active volunteers. We still have great numbers registered, but for many reasons those with the time, ability, health and willingness to deploy even for exercises has dropped. And a year sitting in our recliners with masks on our faces hasn’t helped. The good news is we’re seeing ARES activities starting to take off again, and with that some of the excitement of actually doing ‘stuff’ has resurfaced. I would like to invite you back into ARES to participate! If you’ve “been there done that” for twenty years, your expertise and skill is something to be passed on to the next generation! If you’re unsure that you want to try this stuff, jump on in! You’ll be welcomed, and you’ll be able to pick up on the training and skill that will make you a better all- around ham operator! So get involved- get trained, and stay in practice. There are a lot of critical events that happen fast and won’t give you time to prepare.

ARES

Stan Broadway, N8BHL

Section Emergency Coordinator - Ohio Emergency Coordinator - Delaware County