DELARANEWS

Dan

Dan Romanchik, KB6NU

What amateur radio clubs and services are worth

paying for?

On the amateurradio subreddit (https://www.reddit.com/r/amateurradio/), someone asked: I have always wondered what subscriptions/memberships are worth having? Is ARRL worth the $50/year? What about QRZ $30/year for XML data? Is there something that is a must have ? Several replied in the affirmative about the ARRL: I joined the ARRL so they can lobby for amateur radio when needed. I think ARRL is worth it. If you care about things like DXCC awards, and are in the US, you will need to be an ARRL member. Now that QEX, The National Contest Journal, On the Air and QST digital are all member benefits, I would say you get enough for your $50 to make it worthwhile Of course, there were differing opinions: They [expletive deleted] up the Parity Act so badly that it’s almost hilarious. ARRL will never see a dime from me. There were a lot of comments about subscribing to QRZ.Com: I spend a bunch of time on QRZ every day, and I log every contact in their logbook, and then send it to LoTW, so the XML is well worth it. Also, will all the time on the forums and the articles I spend I enjoy not having the ads, and supporting what I believe is a fantastic website. QRZ is worth it so you can integrate with logging software or if you want upload your ADIF file from WSJT-X, if you do FT8, that sort of thing. I’ve never felt the need for a QRZ subscription. Only when I was the noobest of noobs and couldn’t tell the difference between ON4 and OH2 did I ever run up the 100 lookup a day limit. Now with…alternate… lookup services even hitting the limit might not matter for most hams. There were some comments about supporting local groups: You should definitely seek out your local club(s) and join whatever ones seem like a good fit to you. You can learn a lot from a good club, and having a couple of hands to help with antennas/ loan equipment is a fantastic benefit. I donated to the repeater I use the most. As for me, I am a member of the ARRL, and at various times, have been a member of: AMSAT Amateur Radio Lighthouse Society (ARLHS) TAPR QRP Amateur Radio Club Intl. (QRP-ARCI) Quarter Century Wireless Assn. (QCWA) Northern California DX Foundation (NCDXF) Michigan QRP Club ARROW – the amateur radio club here in Ann Arbor My membership is current in AMSAT, ARLHS, QRP-ARCI, MI QRP Club, and ARROW. I would encourage you to become an ARRL member and a member of other groups that serve your particular interest in amateur radio. I like operating from lighthouses, so I’m a member of ARLHS. If you’re a big DXer, join NCDXF. If you’re a QRPer, then QRP-ARCI is the group for you. Becoming a member really will help you have more fun with amateur radio. You probably belong to your local club if you’re reading this column, but I’m curious about what other amateur radio subscriptions you have or which services you pay for. Feel free to email me and let me know which groups you support and why you do so. Dan Romanchik, KB6NU, is the author of the KB6NU amateur radio blog (KB6NU.Com), the "No Nonsense" amateur radio license study guides (https://KB6NU.Com/study-guides/), and often appears on the ICQPodcast (https://icqpodcast.com). When he's not paying his dues, he teaches online ham radio classes and operates CW on the low end of the HF bands.
DELARANews

Dan

Dan Romanchik, KB6NU

What amateur radio clubs and

services are worth paying for?

On the amateurradio subreddit (https://www.reddit.com/r/amateurradio/), someone asked: I have always wondered what subscriptions/memberships are worth having? Is ARRL worth the $50/year? What about QRZ $30/year for XML data? Is there something that is a must have ? Several replied in the affirmative about the ARRL: I joined the ARRL so they can lobby for amateur radio when needed. I think ARRL is worth it. If you care about things like DXCC awards, and are in the US, you will need to be an ARRL member. Now that QEX, The National Contest Journal, On the Air and QST digital are all member benefits, I would say you get enough for your $50 to make it worthwhile Of course, there were differing opinions: They [expletive deleted] up the Parity Act so badly that it’s almost hilarious. ARRL will never see a dime from me. There were a lot of comments about subscribing to QRZ.Com: I spend a bunch of time on QRZ every day, and I log every contact in their logbook, and then send it to LoTW, so the XML is well worth it. Also, will all the time on the forums and the articles I spend I enjoy not having the ads, and supporting what I believe is a fantastic website. QRZ is worth it so you can integrate with logging software or if you want upload your ADIF file from WSJT-X, if you do FT8, that sort of thing. I’ve never felt the need for a QRZ subscription. Only when I was the noobest of noobs and couldn’t tell the difference between ON4 and OH2 did I ever run up the 100 lookup a day limit. Now with…alternate… lookup services even hitting the limit might not matter for most hams. There were some comments about supporting local groups: You should definitely seek out your local club(s) and join whatever ones seem like a good fit to you. You can learn a lot from a good club, and having a couple of hands to help with antennas/ loan equipment is a fantastic benefit. I donated to the repeater I use the most. As for me, I am a member of the ARRL, and at various times, have been a member of: AMSAT Amateur Radio Lighthouse Society (ARLHS) TAPR QRP Amateur Radio Club Intl. (QRP-ARCI) Quarter Century Wireless Assn. (QCWA) Northern California DX Foundation (NCDXF) Michigan QRP Club ARROW – the amateur radio club here in Ann Arbor My membership is current in AMSAT, ARLHS, QRP- ARCI, MI QRP Club, and ARROW. I would encourage you to become an ARRL member and a member of other groups that serve your particular interest in amateur radio. I like operating from lighthouses, so I’m a member of ARLHS. If you’re a big DXer, join NCDXF. If you’re a QRPer, then QRP-ARCI is the group for you. Becoming a member really will help you have more fun with amateur radio. You probably belong to your local club if you’re reading this column, but I’m curious about what other amateur radio subscriptions you have or which services you pay for. Feel free to email me and let me know which groups you support and why you do so. Dan Romanchik, KB6NU, is the author of the KB6NU amateur radio blog (KB6NU.Com), the "No Nonsense" amateur radio license study guides (https://KB6NU.Com/study-guides/), and often appears on the ICQPodcast (https://icqpodcast.com). When he's not paying his dues, he teaches online ham radio classes and operates CW on the low end of the HF bands.