DELARANEWS

Ham Radio News

…because we don’t live in a vacuum

ARDC Grant Provides ARESLAX with

Sophisticated Noise Location

Capabilities

(And yes, we are looking into the possibilities!) ARESLAX, an arm of the ARRL Los Angeles Section, has used a $23,600 grant from Amateur Radio Digital Communications (ARDC) to purchase equipment that will help Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES®) team members to locate and eliminate sources of radio frequency interference (RFI) that could hinder their operations. "ARESLAX is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization supporting emergency communication initiatives of the Los Angeles Section's ARES program," ARRL Los Angeles Section Manager Diana Feinberg, AI6DF, explained. "Earthquakes and wildfires are the primary disaster threats this region faces. Because these incidents occur without any advance warning, disaster communication groups in the Los Angeles Section must maintain a high degree of readiness." Thanks to the grant, Feinberg said, last spring ARESLAX purchased a Fluke ii910 Precision Acoustic Imager, which combines ultrasonic detection with visual techniques to pinpoint an interference source, such as power line noise, and produce photographic evidence. At the same time, ARESLAX used its own funds to purchase a Radar Engineers 243 RFI Locator and spent the summer familiarizing itself with the sophisticated equipment. "By combining these two purchases with our preexisting equipment, ARRL Los Angeles Section Technical Specialist Chris Parker, AF6PX, believes the Los Angeles Section now has EMI/RFI locating capabilities exceeding those of area utility companies and their contractors," Feinberg said. -ARRL Letter

Radio Amateurs Invited to Participate in

the Antarctic Eclipse Festival in December

(Pay attention! Our very own solar eclipse will happen April 8, 2024 and Delaware County is on the edge of “totality”… meaning it’ll be a short drive to see the complete eclipse. Ohio Amateur Radio is already involved in EMA planning sessions. After that, we’ll have to wait until 2400-something for another in our area.) The HamSCI Antarctic Eclipse Festival in December is seeking amateur radio participation. As the shadow of the moon passes across Antarctica on December 4, it will generate traveling ionospheric disturbances that will, in turn, affect radio propagation. The unusual geometry of this year's eclipses will give researchers an opportunity to investigate complicated ionospheric dynamics over the poles as the long daytime of polar summer is briefly interrupted by the eclipse. During this and other HamSCI eclipse festivals, hams and citizen-scientists are asked to collect Doppler-shift data from time-standard stations, such as WWV. All that's needed is an HF radio connected to a computer. A GPS- disciplined oscillator is helpful for collecting data, but it is not required. Data collection will run from December 1 through December 10, and the results will be made available for scientific analysis. A QSL card image of the HamSCI Antarctic Eclipse Festival. [Zo Linker image] All radio amateurs and shortwave listeners are invited to join in, even those located far from the path of totality. In 2020, more than 100 individuals from 45 countries took part in eclipse festivals.The instructions are available in multiple languages. HamSCI is an initiative of ham radio operators and geospace scientists dedicated to advancing scientific research and understanding through amateur radio activities. Eclipse festivals are pilot campaigns for the Personal Space Weather Station (PSWS), HamSCI's flagship project. The PSWS team seeks to develop a global network of citizen-science stations. Participants monitor the geospace environment to deepen scientific understanding and enhance the radio art. For more information on the Antarctic Eclipse Festival and how to participate, visit the HamSCI website. -- Thanks to Kristina Collins, KD8OXT -ARRL Letter
DELARANews

Ham Radio News

…because we don’t live in a vacuum

ARDC Grant Provides ARESLAX

with Sophisticated Noise Location

Capabilities

(And yes, we are looking into the possibilities!) ARESLAX, an arm of the ARRL Los Angeles Section, has used a $23,600 grant from Amateur Radio Digital Communications (ARDC) to purchase equipment that will help Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES®) team members to locate and eliminate sources of radio frequency interference (RFI) that could hinder their operations. "ARESLAX is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization supporting emergency communication initiatives of the Los Angeles Section's ARES program," ARRL Los Angeles Section Manager Diana Feinberg, AI6DF, explained. "Earthquakes and wildfires are the primary disaster threats this region faces. Because these incidents occur without any advance warning, disaster communication groups in the Los Angeles Section must maintain a high degree of readiness." Thanks to the grant, Feinberg said, last spring ARESLAX purchased a Fluke ii910 Precision Acoustic Imager, which combines ultrasonic detection with visual techniques to pinpoint an interference source, such as power line noise, and produce photographic evidence. At the same time, ARESLAX used its own funds to purchase a Radar Engineers 243 RFI Locator and spent the summer familiarizing itself with the sophisticated equipment. "By combining these two purchases with our preexisting equipment, ARRL Los Angeles Section Technical Specialist Chris Parker, AF6PX, believes the Los Angeles Section now has EMI/RFI locating capabilities exceeding those of area utility companies and their contractors," Feinberg said. -ARRL Letter