DELARANEWS

Section news

Tom Sly, WB8LCD

Ham Radio is such an expensive hobby! How could anyone ever afford to get involved with it? Take a good look at the radio gear above taken from the 1972 Heathkit catalog. If you were a kid getting into the hobby, that might have been a pretty good way to get started. If you look at the “Novice Gear” page, you could buy that whole station, including the VFO and the plug-in crystal calibrator for only $217.35! Pretty good deal. But wait, step back into 2021 for a minute. Using the US Bureau of Labor Statistics calculator (available online), the present value of that $217.35 on January 1, 1972 would be $1446.71 in August of 2021! When you think of it in terms of dollars only, the $1446.71 is not unobtainable in the world today – even to a youngster. But, even keeping the number of dollars the same – as adjusted for inflation – think of what you could get for the $1446.71 today. How about an Icom 7300, with a power supply, and still having money left over for an HT, a roll of coax and a dipole antenna kit. I would say that the advances in the technology far outpaced the cost based on inflation. When you look at the whole package, it’s never been cheaper to get into Ham Radio and have some really neat “Gear” at the same time! And that’s part of the MAGIC of our hobby……. But there’s a different point of entry to the hobby these days. I don’t have a statistic, but I’d be willing to say that the number is north of 75% of those coming into the hobby, that their first experience is with an HT. I’d also be willing to bet that for an awful lot of them, that first experience is somewhat of a let-down. Let’s say you are a new ham, with a new HT. You program in all of the local repeaters. You turn it on, and you hear nothing! You’re still excited so you listen some more, nothing. You call out asking if there is anyone there, no response. I can imagine it might be especially tough if you’re a kid. BUT, that’s not the new guy’s fault! That’s our fault. It’s our responsibility to give that new Ham a good first experience with the hobby so that he’ll want to continue with it and bring along his friends and family. Here’s what we need to do. Turn on your HT (I know you’ve probably got 3-5 of them, on average), listen to your local repeater and throw your callsign out there every once in a while, so others will know you’re listening too. Turn on the radio in your car and toss your callsign out there, even if it’s only a short trip. Strike up a conversation, make some noise so the new guys can find you. Most importantly, when you hear someone you don’t know, or someone who is obviously new, give them a call. Help them experience the MAGIC of radio! And please, be nice. Your job is to give them a good first experience, not to point out all the mistakes they may be making. Our hobby needs new members. We need to make a good first impression on anyone and everyone who is interested in getting started with our hobby. Yes, ARRL, other national and international clubs, and our local clubs can all do more to bring in new hams and give them the experience they need to stay engaged. But more importantly, it’s an individual responsibility for each of us to be an ambassador to those we come into contact with. I’m challenging you to be there when the new guy shows up and let him know he’s welcome to join us. Important update on Distracted Driving Proposal Regarding OH HB283 – the distracted driving law, I’ve heard from many of you that you have contacted your local representative. Good JOB! And keep it up. Chris – KD2HCE received the following response: “Hello Chris, thanks for reaching out. HB 283 had a 3rd Hearing in the House Criminal Justice Committee in September. During that meeting, an amendment was adopted to HB 283 that exempted those licensed as amateur radio operators from the distracted driving law when using their amateur radios (otherwise known as HAM Radios). The bill currently remains in the House Criminal Justice Committee. Let me know if there is anything else our office can assist with. Thanks, James James Lee Legislative Aide Office of State Representative Sharon Ray Finally, a little bit of Ohio / Radio history. Sent to me from N9ACC – Arnal Cook: Tom, I attended my Navy SPECWAR Unit reunion in August. Thisplacard caught my attention as I got off the Jetboat ferry at Put in Bay, OH. You can blow the picture and read it. First ship-to-shore comms. " First Ship to Shore Radio Broadcast Bayview and Hartford Avenues, near the Jet Express Dock On July 18, 1907, Dr. Lee deForest broadcast the first ship-toshore radio message from the steam yacht Thelma. The communication provided quick, accurate race results of the Annual Inter-Lakes Yachting Association (I-LYA) Regatta. Frank E. Butler, a Monroeville, Ohio, native and assistant to deForest, was stationed in the pavilion at Fox’s Dock (known today as The Jet Express Dock) and received the radio transmission. The creation of the vacuum tube by deForest permitted the rapid development of radio and eventually television. The inventor disliked the existing term “wireless,” and chose a new moniker — “radio.” On this site wireless-transmission radio broadcasting was born. " Keep your eyes and ears open! You never know what you’ll find out there with an interesting connection.
DELARANews

Section news

Tom Sly, WB8LCD

Ham Radio is such an expensive hobby! How could anyone ever afford to get involved with it? Take a good look at the radio gear above taken from the 1972 Heathkit catalog. If you were a kid getting into the hobby, that might have been a pretty good way to get started. If you look at the “Novice Gear” page, you could buy that whole station, including the VFO and the plug-in crystal calibrator for only $217.35! Pretty good deal. But wait, step back into 2021 for a minute. Using the US Bureau of Labor Statistics calculator (available online), the present value of that $217.35 on January 1, 1972 would be $1446.71 in August of 2021! When you think of it in terms of dollars only, the $1446.71 is not unobtainable in the world today – even to a youngster. But, even keeping the number of dollars the same – as adjusted for inflation – think of what you could get for the $1446.71 today. How about an Icom 7300, with a power supply, and still having money left over for an HT, a roll of coax and a dipole antenna kit. I would say that the advances in the technology far outpaced the cost based on inflation. When you look at the whole package, it’s never been cheaper to get into Ham Radio and have some really neat “Gear” at the same time! And that’s part of the MAGIC of our hobby……. But there’s a different point of entry to the hobby these days. I don’t have a statistic, but I’d be willing to say that the number is north of 75% of those coming into the hobby, that their first experience is with an HT. I’d also be willing to bet that for an awful lot of them, that first experience is somewhat of a let-down. Let’s say you are a new ham, with a new HT. You program in all of the local repeaters. You turn it on, and you hear nothing! You’re still excited so you listen some more, nothing. You call out asking if there is anyone there, no response. I can imagine it might be especially tough if you’re a kid. BUT, that’s not the new guy’s fault! That’s our fault. It’s our responsibility to give that new Ham a good first experience with the hobby so that he’ll want to continue with it and bring along his friends and family. Here’s what we need to do. Turn on your HT (I know you’ve probably got 3-5 of them, on average), listen to your local repeater and throw your callsign out there every once in a while, so others will know you’re listening too. Turn on the radio in your car and toss your callsign out there, even if it’s only a short trip. Strike up a conversation, make some noise so the new guys can find you. Most importantly, when you hear someone you don’t know, or someone who is obviously new, give them a call. Help them experience the MAGIC of radio! And please, be nice. Your job is to give them a good first experience, not to point out all the mistakes they may be making. Our hobby needs new members. We need to make a good first impression on anyone and everyone who is interested in getting started with our hobby. Yes, ARRL, other national and international clubs, and our local clubs can all do more to bring in new hams and give them the experience they need to stay engaged. But more importantly, it’s an individual responsibility for each of us to be an ambassador to those we come into contact with. I’m challenging you to be there when the new guy shows up and let him know he’s welcome to join us. Important update on Distracted Driving Proposal Regarding OH HB283 – the distracted driving law, I’ve heard from many of you that you have contacted your local representative. Good JOB! And keep it up. Chris – KD2HCE received the following response: “Hello Chris, thanks for reaching out. HB 283 had a 3rd Hearing in the House Criminal Justice Committee in September. During that meeting, an amendment was adopted to HB 283 that exempted those licensed as amateur radio operators from the distracted driving law when using their amateur radios (otherwise known as HAM Radios). The bill currently remains in the House Criminal Justice Committee. Let me know if there is anything else our office can assist with. Thanks, James James Lee Legislative Aide Office of State Representative Sharon Ray Finally, a little bit of Ohio / Radio history. Sent to me from N9ACC – Arnal Cook: Tom, I attended my Navy SPECWAR Unit reunion in August. Thisplacard caught my attention as I got off the Jetboat ferry at Put in Bay, OH. You can blow the picture and read it. First ship-to-shore comms. " First Ship to Shore Radio Broadcast Bayview and Hartford Avenues, near the Jet Express Dock On July 18, 1907, Dr. Lee deForest broadcast the first ship-toshore radio message from the steam yacht Thelma. The communication provided quick, accurate race results of the Annual Inter-Lakes Yachting Association (I-LYA) Regatta. Frank E. Butler, a Monroeville, Ohio, native and assistant to deForest, was stationed in the pavilion at Fox’s Dock (known today as The Jet Express Dock) and received the radio transmission. The creation of the vacuum tube by deForest permitted the rapid development of radio and eventually television. The inventor disliked the existing term “wireless,” and chose a new moniker — “radio.” On this site wireless-transmission radio broadcasting was born. " Keep your eyes and ears open! You never know what you’ll find out there with an interesting connection.