DELARANEWS

Traffic Coordinator

Dave Maynard, WA3EZN

(Note- this was published prior to the SET, but it’s a good explaination of the event) The 2021 ARRL Simulated Emergency Test (SET) is just ahead. This primary ARRL-sponsored national emergency exercise is designed to assess the skills and preparedness of ARES volunteers, as well as those affiliated with other organizations involved in emergency and disaster response. The primary SET Ohio weekend is October 2-3. The annual SET encourages maximum participation by all amateur radio operators, partner organizations, and national, state, and local officials who typically engage in emergency or disaster response. In addition to ARES volunteers, radio amateurs active in the National Traffic System, Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service (RACES), SKYWARN, Community Emergency Response Team (CERT), and a variety of other allied groups and public service-oriented radio amateurs are needed to fulfill important roles in this nationwide exercise. The SET allows volunteers to test equipment, modes, and skills under simulated emergency conditions and scenarios. Individuals can use the time to update a "go-kit" for use during deployments and to ensure their home station's operational capability in an emergency or disaster. To get involved, contact your local ARRL Emergency Coordinator or Net Manager. Check on upcoming planned activities through local, state, or Section-wide nets. Reminder: The first words in Part 97 of the FCC's rules mandating the basis and purpose of our service read as follows: "Recognition and enhancement of the value of the amateur service to the public as a voluntary noncommercial communication service, particularly with respect to providing emergency communications." [emphasis added] It's something to think about. TIP FOR SUCCESS: The earlier you send your SET radiograms the more chance you have to send them without delay. Every year some stations wait until the last minute to send their radiograms and they run into a 'traffic jam' on the OSSBN. The OSSBN plan is to have nets at 10:30 AM, 4:15 PM and 6:45 PM. For SET these nets will run until all traffic is collected or passed. Check their frequency periodically if you have traffic as additional nets may be held if needed. Also local VHF nets as listed below may be available to take your traffic. One of the first steps on the way to a successful SET is to try to get as many people involved as possible and especially new hams. In a real emergency, we find amateurs with all sorts of varied interests coming out of the woodwork. Let's get them involved in SET so they will know more about how emergency communications should be handled. Promote SET on nets and repeaters, and sign up new, enthusiastic radio amateurs. Many of those offering to help will be inexperienced in public-service activities. It's up to you to explain what's going on to them, and provide them with useful roles. They may like it so much that they become a permanent fixture in your ARES or NTS group. For a review of last year's nationwide Simulated Emergency Test, look for the article in QST. The ARRL Simulated Emergency Test is a nationwide exercise in emergency communications, administered by ARRL Field Organization Leaders including Emergency Coordinators, District Emergency Coordinators, Section Emergency Coordinators and Net Managers. Many other Section Leaders like the Section Manager and the Section Traffic Manager may have a hand in planning the exercises and/or reviewing the results. Amateur Radio Emergency Service ® (ARES®), National Traffic System (NTS), Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service (RACES) , CERTS and other public-service oriented groups can be involved. The SET weekend gives communicators the opportunity to focus on the emergency-communications capability within the community while interacting with NTS nets. In Ohio the Simulated Emergency Test is held the first weekend in October, that being October 2 and 3 this year. It is important that all amateurs participate and show just how great the hams are in Ohio. The purpose of SET is to find out the strengths and weaknesses of ARES, NTS, RACES and other groups in providing emergency communications. It also should provide a public demonstration to served agencies such as the American Red Cross, the Emergency Management Agency and through the news media of the value to the public that Amateur Radio provides, particularly in time of need. To help radio amateurs gain experience in communications using standard procedures and a variety of modes under simulated-emergency conditions. Lets have some fun with Public Service Honor Roll (PSHR). As an example suppose the Ohio Single Sideband Net (OSSBN) could file a PSHR report (it not eligible). Here is their report for August: Stations checking in 1525 – 40 point limit = 40 points Traffic handled 282 – limit 40 points = 40 points OSSBN is an independent net, no ARRL appointments – 0 Time net was in session 1756 minutes – no limit = 30 hours x 5 = 150 points OSSBN has a website so lets give it 10 point for that = 10 points So if OSSBN could file a PSHR report it would look like this: 40 40 0 150 0 10 TOTAL 358. The point I am trying to make is that your net participation is worth 5 point per hour. Lets look at an actual PSHR report I received for August: 21 5 10 0 0 TOTAL 36. Now lets suppose that this individual checked into all 93 OSSBN nets in August and stayed until the NCS closed the nets. Their PSHR score could be 21 5 10 150 0 0 TOTAL 186. Their call would be listed in the QST field report with a score of 186 as it is more than 70 points. So, you can not use the OSSBN numbers to enhance your own PSHR report but you can keep a monthly log of you activities on OSSBN, 8RN, Eastern Area, SKYWARN or your local VHF net. You know when the net starts and at the end of each net the NCS usually give the closing time. How much more simple can it get? Record the starting and closing times. Add up the minutes and divide by 60 (minutes) give your hours of participation. You have then earned 5 points per hour. So looking at item 4 and 5 in the PSHR report give us some valuable information. 4) Participation in scheduled, short-term public service events such as walk-a-thons, bike-athons, parades, simulated emergency tests and related practice events. This includes off-theair meetings and coordination efforts with related emergency groups and served agencies. -- 5 points per hour (or any portion thereof) of time spent in either coordinating and/or operating in the public service event; no limit. This category recognizes the value of public safety communication events that Amateur Radio is often called to participate in. Simulated emergency tests, exercises, and drills are covered by this category. Points are gained by the amount of time that an Amateur Radio operator spends directly involved in operating the event. This also recognizes the value of off-the-air time it takes to meet with the organization or public service agency to plan and coordinate Amateur Radio involvement. PSHR Category 4 is set up to recognize Amateur Radio operators for what they do in performance of public service events. Therefore, time spent in group and one-on-one ARES/RACES meetings, phone calls, email, and group administrative duties (processing and maintaining ARES/RACES member records and planning/conducting member training, for example) all are part of the 'public service communication event support' definition and would count. 5) Participation in an UNPLANNED EMERGENCY RESPONSE when the Amateur Radio operator is on the scene. This also includes unplanned incident requests by public or served agencies for Amateur Radio participation. --5 points per hour (or any portion thereof) of time spent directly involved in the emergency operation; no limit. This category recognizes an Amateur Radio operator who is directly involved in an actual emergency operation. This includes the operator who is on the scene or out in the field, in the shelter, at the emergency operations center, at the hospital, or other served agency's headquarters or their temporary command center. If you are an active participant in an unplanned incident -- or in other words, an emergency operation--you may take credit for this participation even though you may not be physically at the emergency scene. Category 5 covers all the Amateur Radio operator participants such as net controllers, net liaison stations and other radio amateurs that support communications in unplanned incidents. Even if you are not actually on the emergency scene or at the shelter, etc, but are spending time and efforts for supporting the same emergency communication effort, then this time would count for points in Category 5. As an example, if the National Weather Service activates SKYWARN, Amateur Radio operators serve as weather spotters from their home (or car, or work, or other locations) during the weather event. Then, a tornado strikes and the American Red Cross calls out the ARES members to serve in shelters and to provide support for damage assessment communications. These operators would be able to qualify for Category 5 points. There would likely be several net control operators, net liaison operators, traffic handlers, etc, who are away from the disaster scene, but are spending time to support the Amateur Radio emergency communication effort on behalf of the served agencies (American Red Cross and National Weather Service, in this example). They, too, would qualify for points under Category 5. Notice that item 5 is only used for UNPLANNED EMERGENCY RESPONSES. This is when you are activated thru the ARES or other served agency. Remember that ham operators DO NOT self activate. Stay away from an emergency situation unless you are activated. If you self activate you become part of the problem.
DELARANews

Traffic

Coordinator

Dave Maynard, WA3EZN

(Note- this was published prior to the SET, but it’s a good explaination of the event) The 2021 ARRL Simulated Emergency Test (SET) is just ahead. This primary ARRL-sponsored national emergency exercise is designed to assess the skills and preparedness of ARES volunteers, as well as those affiliated with other organizations involved in emergency and disaster response. The primary SET Ohio weekend is October 2-3. The annual SET encourages maximum participation by all amateur radio operators, partner organizations, and national, state, and local officials who typically engage in emergency or disaster response. In addition to ARES volunteers, radio amateurs active in the National Traffic System, Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service (RACES), SKYWARN, Community Emergency Response Team (CERT), and a variety of other allied groups and public service-oriented radio amateurs are needed to fulfill important roles in this nationwide exercise. The SET allows volunteers to test equipment, modes, and skills under simulated emergency conditions and scenarios. Individuals can use the time to update a "go-kit" for use during deployments and to ensure their home station's operational capability in an emergency or disaster. To get involved, contact your local ARRL Emergency Coordinator or Net Manager. Check on upcoming planned activities through local, state, or Section-wide nets. Reminder: The first words in Part 97 of the FCC's rules mandating the basis and purpose of our service read as follows: "Recognition and enhancement of the value of the amateur service to the public as a voluntary noncommercial communication service, particularly with respect to providing emergency communications." [emphasis added] It's something to think about. TIP FOR SUCCESS: The earlier you send your SET radiograms the more chance you have to send them without delay. Every year some stations wait until the last minute to send their radiograms and they run into a 'traffic jam' on the OSSBN. The OSSBN plan is to have nets at 10:30 AM, 4:15 PM and 6:45 PM. For SET these nets will run until all traffic is collected or passed. Check their frequency periodically if you have traffic as additional nets may be held if needed. Also local VHF nets as listed below may be available to take your traffic. One of the first steps on the way to a successful SET is to try to get as many people involved as possible and especially new hams. In a real emergency, we find amateurs with all sorts of varied interests coming out of the woodwork. Let's get them involved in SET so they will know more about how emergency communications should be handled. Promote SET on nets and repeaters, and sign up new, enthusiastic radio amateurs. Many of those offering to help will be inexperienced in public- service activities. It's up to you to explain what's going on to them, and provide them with useful roles. They may like it so much that they become a permanent fixture in your ARES or NTS group. For a review of last year's nationwide Simulated Emergency Test, look for the article in QST. The ARRL Simulated Emergency Test is a nationwide exercise in emergency communications, administered by ARRL Field Organization Leaders including Emergency Coordinators, District Emergency Coordinators, Section Emergency Coordinators and Net Managers. Many other Section Leaders like the Section Manager and the Section Traffic Manager may have a hand in planning the exercises and/or reviewing the results. Amateur Radio Emergency Service ® (ARES®), National Traffic System (NTS), Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service (RACES) , CERTS and other public-service oriented groups can be involved. The SET weekend gives communicators the opportunity to focus on the emergency-communications capability within the community while interacting with NTS nets. In Ohio the Simulated Emergency Test is held the first weekend in October, that being October 2 and 3 this year. It is important that all amateurs participate and show just how great the hams are in Ohio. The purpose of SET is to find out the strengths and weaknesses of ARES, NTS, RACES and other groups in providing emergency communications. It also should provide a public demonstration to served agencies such as the American Red Cross, the Emergency Management Agency and through the news media of the value to the public that Amateur Radio provides, particularly in time of need. To help radio amateurs gain experience in communications using standard procedures and a variety of modes under simulated-emergency conditions. Lets have some fun with Public Service Honor Roll (PSHR). As an example suppose the Ohio Single Sideband Net (OSSBN) could file a PSHR report (it not eligible). Here is their report for August: Stations checking in 1525 – 40 point limit = 40 points Traffic handled 282 – limit 40 points = 40 points OSSBN is an independent net, no ARRL appointments – 0 Time net was in session 1756 minutes – no limit = 30 hours x 5 = 150 points OSSBN has a website so lets give it 10 point for that = 10 points So if OSSBN could file a PSHR report it would look like this: 40 40 0 150 0 10 TOTAL 358. The point I am trying to make is that your net participation is worth 5 point per hour. Lets look at an actual PSHR report I received for August: 21 5 10 0 0 TOTAL 36. Now lets suppose that this individual checked into all 93 OSSBN nets in August and stayed until the NCS closed the nets. Their PSHR score could be 21 5 10 150 0 0 TOTAL 186. Their call would be listed in the QST field report with a score of 186 as it is more than 70 points. So, you can not use the OSSBN numbers to enhance your own PSHR report but you can keep a monthly log of you activities on OSSBN, 8RN, Eastern Area, SKYWARN or your local VHF net. You know when the net starts and at the end of each net the NCS usually give the closing time. How much more simple can it get? Record the starting and closing times. Add up the minutes and divide by 60 (minutes) give your hours of participation. You have then earned 5 points per hour. So looking at item 4 and 5 in the PSHR report give us some valuable information. 4) Participation in scheduled, short-term public service events such as walk-a-thons, bike-athons, parades, simulated emergency tests and related practice events. This includes off-theair meetings and coordination efforts with related emergency groups and served agencies. -- 5 points per hour (or any portion thereof) of time spent in either coordinating and/or operating in the public service event; no limit. This category recognizes the value of public safety communication events that Amateur Radio is often called to participate in. Simulated emergency tests, exercises, and drills are covered by this category. Points are gained by the amount of time that an Amateur Radio operator spends directly involved in operating the event. This also recognizes the value of off-the-air time it takes to meet with the organization or public service agency to plan and coordinate Amateur Radio involvement. PSHR Category 4 is set up to recognize Amateur Radio operators for what they do in performance of public service events. Therefore, time spent in group and one-on-one ARES/RACES meetings, phone calls, email, and group administrative duties (processing and maintaining ARES/RACES member records and planning/conducting member training, for example) all are part of the 'public service communication event support' definition and would count. 5) Participation in an UNPLANNED EMERGENCY RESPONSE when the Amateur Radio operator is on the scene. This also includes unplanned incident requests by public or served agencies for Amateur Radio participation. --5 points per hour (or any portion thereof) of time spent directly involved in the emergency operation; no limit. This category recognizes an Amateur Radio operator who is directly involved in an actual emergency operation. This includes the operator who is on the scene or out in the field, in the shelter, at the emergency operations center, at the hospital, or other served agency's headquarters or their temporary command center. If you are an active participant in an unplanned incident -- or in other words, an emergency operation--you may take credit for this participation even though you may not be physically at the emergency scene. Category 5 covers all the Amateur Radio operator participants such as net controllers, net liaison stations and other radio amateurs that support communications in unplanned incidents. Even if you are not actually on the emergency scene or at the shelter, etc, but are spending time and efforts for supporting the same emergency communication effort, then this time would count for points in Category 5. As an example, if the National Weather Service activates SKYWARN, Amateur Radio operators serve as weather spotters from their home (or car, or work, or other locations) during the weather event. Then, a tornado strikes and the American Red Cross calls out the ARES members to serve in shelters and to provide support for damage assessment communications. These operators would be able to qualify for Category 5 points. There would likely be several net control operators, net liaison operators, traffic handlers, etc, who are away from the disaster scene, but are spending time to support the Amateur Radio emergency communication effort on behalf of the served agencies (American Red Cross and National Weather Service, in this example). They, too, would qualify for points under Category 5. Notice that item 5 is only used for UNPLANNED EMERGENCY RESPONSES. This is when you are activated thru the ARES or other served agency. Remember that ham operators DO NOT self activate. Stay away from an emergency situation unless you are activated. If you self activate you become part of the problem.