DELARANEWS

ARES

Stan Broadway, N8BHL Ohio SEC, Delaware EC

Get Set for SET!

The 2021 Simulated Emergency Test (SET) will be held October 2, Saturday, from 9AM until 1 PM. This is a very important exercise! We all consider amateur radio to be the “Backup for the backup” but the question remains, are we ~ready and able~ to perform if called? I am confident that thanks to Bob’s twice weekly digital nets, and our enthusiasm for monthly training, and the many who regularly engage in portable operation that we’re in a very good position to provide service to the County EMA and the Red Cross and any other agency which calls. But without practice, we can falter and forget. And without practice, we have no demonstrable proof for our agencies. That’s where the SET is critically important. We have changed the nature of SET for 2021- moving away from the “Black Swan” series and back to our own independent exercise. We’re going back to the basics in a lot of ways, but the basics can be rarely practiced. The scenario is a two-fold weather emergency: a derecho moving across Ohio followed by several days of -30 degree cold…. amidst all the power outages left by the wind. In truth, the scenario doesn’t really matter- it’s the challenge that this all presents for us to deal with- power outages long-term causing cell and other communications systems to fail complicated by extreme cold weather. Our goal is to activate, deploy, set up temporary communication, and pass messages just as if the situation were real. Delaware County ARES will activate at 9 AM with Bob, W8ERD, and Craig, W8CR, calling the game. You can expect to be texted or called or, if it’s 9 AM you can call in on the 17 repeater and mark yourself available. You won’t really have to dress for extreme cold (it’ll get a little sweaty in real life!) but you might consider some preparation: cold weather gear, gasoline in your vehicle, backup heat source for your home and family, food and a means to cook it without power. Remember, your FIRST consideration is your own safety and your family! With that in mind, you will likely be dispatched to a location within the county - likely a shelter or a major responder’s location such as law enforcement, fire, hospital or other. If you have and can operate digital software on a laptop, that’ll be extra good! We’ll want to send voice messages and digital messages around the county to other stations, to the ARC, and elsewhere. One of the goals is to send messages to neighboring counties and the state. So you may be pressed to “imagine” some needs at your location, ans send those to the EOC via the ARC net control. We hope to provide enough work to keep you busy for the period, and to keep as many people as are available involved in the operation! The more we do, the more fun this will be and the more we’ll all get out of the exercise. This is an ARES exercise, but more are welcome. If you’re in ARES be ready to go! If this interests you be ready also- and check into 17 when it all starts to happen. It could be a stretch, it could be a learning experience, and it most probably will be fun! THANKS! Many thanks to those who worked Ironman, the Horse Parade and the other activities ARES has done so far this year! It’s really nice to be out and about, and it’s great to get back to work!

Ohio ARES: Put up or shut up!

Well, that’s a little harsh. But it’s a likely situation we all may face if some situation causes us to be activated across Ohio. For many, being in ARES is not exactly an active, gung-ho experience especially over the last year. But we’re getting back into the swing now, and it’s time to get our rusty rears out on to the street! Thank you all for being part of public service events so far this summer! And thank you for being ready for the call! When (not if) that call comes, we will need to “put up” our best, most professional performance to first serve our communities, and second to justify our position as a viable volunteer agency. Ohio Amateur Radio has a respected tradition of being ready. It’s up to us to stay that way! What does that look like? Life in Ohio doesn’t offer those big events we read about- or does it? We’re not immune from statewide multiple tornado outbreaks, even Derecho’s which bring heavy damage. There are other widespread incidents that could result in ham radio operators being an integral part of Ohio’s response. Consider IDA and the issues it presented to responders. In the Gulf, where systems are very well hardened to storms, ham radio was there but major systems (with some exceptions) were operational. Consider, however, what that storm system did to the northeast U.S. with extreme flooding and multiple deaths. That type of thing could easily happen here- and our “Watch Desk” project of linked DMR/Fusion systems as well as HF voice and digital would be critical to provide situational awareness to your county EOC and the Ohio EOC. It's for that reason we must practice and keep ourselves ready to go. The Ohio Simulated Emergency Test (SET) does just that, and we hope YOU will participate October 2. By now you should know the drill, literally. A derecho followed by a long-term power outage in extreme cold weather (-30-ish) will create numerous hardships which would reasonably require the service of amateur radio. Consider warming shelters, transportation issues, communications for law and fire agencies not to mention supplies. Our SET this year will concentrate on the basics: activation, deployment, handling messages. I urge you to spend a few hours October 2 with your ARES group and stay prepared for the real thing! In Ohio, the real thing may not actually be a “disaster”. It might be something completely out of the routine that presents multiple challenges to our government agencies. Such an event might be a full solar eclipse…and Ohio Amateur Radio has been meeting with literally hundreds of agency representatives for just that very thing. April 8 2024, we will have the opportunity to watch a full solar eclipse move across Ohio. A number of counties will be directly affected, and at first the reality of the challenges isn’t apparent. But as we discuss the different aspects, these challenges become extremely large and difficult. It’s a good thing Ohio’s EMA is planning already! Many of the counties in the “total blackout’ zone are rural in nature, for example one may have a population under 100,000. On the days leading up to and after the eclipse, they may have to deal with 500-600,000 spectators… all wanting somewhere to stay, eat, get fuel and get home. It reinforces the state’s respect for and dependance on amateur radio to be invited to participate from the ground up. It's too early to formulate an ARES response just yet, but I wouldn’t be surprised if this becomes an “all hands” event, bringing operators from pretty much all over Ohio to get things done. With that, the challenge of where do ~we~ sleep, eat, get fuel, and even get around. I’ll keep you updated as plans develop!

Amateur Radio is more than

a hobby- it becomes an

important service when

other forms of

communication fail. It’s up

to all of us to stay ready,

stay trained, and stay

available. We could be

required on a moment’s

notice.

Delaware County ARES is part of the national ARRL program. We rely on our volunteers. We operate during several large public events including the national-level Ironman competition. We hold a radio net on the 145.19 repeater (no tone) on the first Thursday of every month at 8PM. We hold a training meeting on the second Thursday of every month at 7:30 usually at the Red Cross building. All amateurs are invited! For information, contact Stan, N8BHL the Delaware County Emergency Coordinator, or Joe, K8MP or Craig, W8CR.
DELARANews

ARES

Stan Broadway, N8BHL Ohio SEC,

Delaware EC

Get Set for SET!

The 2021 Simulated Emergency Test (SET) will be held October 2, Saturday, from 9AM until 1 PM. This is a very important exercise! We all consider amateur radio to be the “Backup for the backup” but the question remains, are we ~ready and able~ to perform if called? I am confident that thanks to Bob’s twice weekly digital nets, and our enthusiasm for monthly training, and the many who regularly engage in portable operation that we’re in a very good position to provide service to the County EMA and the Red Cross and any other agency which calls. But without practice, we can falter and forget. And without practice, we have no demonstrable proof for our agencies. That’s where the SET is critically important. We have changed the nature of SET for 2021- moving away from the “Black Swan” series and back to our own independent exercise. We’re going back to the basics in a lot of ways, but the basics can be rarely practiced. The scenario is a two-fold weather emergency: a derecho moving across Ohio followed by several days of -30 degree cold…. amidst all the power outages left by the wind. In truth, the scenario doesn’t really matter- it’s the challenge that this all presents for us to deal with- power outages long- term causing cell and other communications systems to fail complicated by extreme cold weather. Our goal is to activate, deploy, set up temporary communication, and pass messages just as if the situation were real. Delaware County ARES will activate at 9 AM with Bob, W8ERD, and Craig, W8CR, calling the game. You can expect to be texted or called or, if it’s 9 AM you can call in on the 17 repeater and mark yourself available. You won’t really have to dress for extreme cold (it’ll get a little sweaty in real life!) but you might consider some preparation: cold weather gear, gasoline in your vehicle, backup heat source for your home and family, food and a means to cook it without power. Remember, your FIRST consideration is your own safety and your family! With that in mind, you will likely be dispatched to a location within the county - likely a shelter or a major responder’s location such as law enforcement, fire, hospital or other. If you have and can operate digital software on a laptop, that’ll be extra good! We’ll want to send voice messages and digital messages around the county to other stations, to the ARC, and elsewhere. One of the goals is to send messages to neighboring counties and the state. So you may be pressed to “imagine” some needs at your location, ans send those to the EOC via the ARC net control. We hope to provide enough work to keep you busy for the period, and to keep as many people as are available involved in the operation! The more we do, the more fun this will be and the more we’ll all get out of the exercise. This is an ARES exercise, but more are welcome. If you’re in ARES be ready to go! If this interests you be ready also- and check into 17 when it all starts to happen. It could be a stretch, it could be a learning experience, and it most probably will be fun! THANKS! Many thanks to those who worked Ironman, the Horse Parade and the other activities ARES has done so far this year! It’s really nice to be out and about, and it’s great to get back to work!

Ohio ARES: Put up or shut up!

Well, that’s a little harsh. But it’s a likely situation we all may face if some situation causes us to be activated across Ohio. For many, being in ARES is not exactly an active, gung-ho experience especially over the last year. But we’re getting back into the swing now, and it’s time to get our rusty rears out on to the street! Thank you all for being part of public service events so far this summer! And thank you for being ready for the call! When (not if) that call comes, we will need to “put up” our best, most professional performance to first serve our communities, and second to justify our position as a viable volunteer agency. Ohio Amateur Radio has a respected tradition of being ready. It’s up to us to stay that way! What does that look like? Life in Ohio doesn’t offer those big events we read about- or does it? We’re not immune from statewide multiple tornado outbreaks, even Derecho’s which bring heavy damage. There are other widespread incidents that could result in ham radio operators being an integral part of Ohio’s response. Consider IDA and the issues it presented to responders. In the Gulf, where systems are very well hardened to storms, ham radio was there but major systems (with some exceptions) were operational. Consider, however, what that storm system did to the northeast U.S. with extreme flooding and multiple deaths. That type of thing could easily happen here- and our “Watch Desk” project of linked DMR/Fusion systems as well as HF voice and digital would be critical to provide situational awareness to your county EOC and the Ohio EOC. It's for that reason we must practice and keep ourselves ready to go. The Ohio Simulated Emergency Test (SET) does just that, and we hope YOU will participate October 2. By now you should know the drill, literally. A derecho followed by a long- term power outage in extreme cold weather (-30- ish) will create numerous hardships which would reasonably require the service of amateur radio. Consider warming shelters, transportation issues, communications for law and fire agencies not to mention supplies. Our SET this year will concentrate on the basics: activation, deployment, handling messages. I urge you to spend a few hours October 2 with your ARES group and stay prepared for the real thing! In Ohio, the real thing may not actually be a “disaster”. It might be something completely out of the routine that presents multiple challenges to our government agencies. Such an event might be a full solar eclipse…and Ohio Amateur Radio has been meeting with literally hundreds of agency representatives for just that very thing. April 8 2024, we will have the opportunity to watch a full solar eclipse move across Ohio. A number of counties will be directly affected, and at first the reality of the challenges isn’t apparent. But as we discuss the different aspects, these challenges become extremely large and difficult. It’s a good thing Ohio’s EMA is planning already! Many of the counties in the “total blackout’ zone are rural in nature, for example one may have a population under 100,000. On the days leading up to and after the eclipse, they may have to deal with 500-600,000 spectators… all wanting somewhere to stay, eat, get fuel and get home. It reinforces the state’s respect for and dependance on amateur radio to be invited to participate from the ground up. It's too early to formulate an ARES response just yet, but I wouldn’t be surprised if this becomes an “all hands” event, bringing operators from pretty much all over Ohio to get things done. With that, the challenge of where do ~we~ sleep, eat, get fuel, and even get around. I’ll keep you updated as plans develop!

ARES

Stan Broadway, N8BHL

Section Emergency Coordinator - Ohio Emergency Coordinator - Delaware County