DELARANEWS

Section news

Tom Sly, WB8LCD

I have been “Ranting” about clubs quite a bit lately. I’m going to continue that here because I truly believe that “CLUBS” are what can save Amateur Radio and make sure it exists into the future. But we’ve got some work to do. From the Federal Register Title 47: Telecommunication, in part 97 you will find the rules and regulations that define the Amateur Radio Service. For this conversation we will look at part 97.1 – The Basis and Purpose of Amateur Radio: Subpart A—General Provisions §97.1 Basis and purpose. The rules and regulations in this part are designed to provide an amateur radio service having a fundamental purpose as expressed in the following principles: (a) Recognition and enhancement of the value of the amateur service to the public as a voluntary noncommercial communication service, particularly with respect to providing emergency communications. (b) Continuation and extension of the amateur's proven ability to contribute to the advancement of the radio art. (c) Encouragement and improvement of the amateur service through rules which provide for advancing skills in both the communication and technical phases of the art. (d) Expansion of the existing reservoir within the amateur radio service of trained operators, technicians, and electronics experts. (e) Continuation and extension of the amateur's unique ability to enhance international goodwill. I’m probably going to be accused of committing some sacrilege here, but this is not exactly what we should use as a guideline as to how our clubs should operate! Not that these goals for the Amateur Radio Service will not be met, but the activities of our clubs will lead to the accomplishment of these goals by doing what clubs should have as their objectives. Following are Tom’s General Provisions for the Basis and Purpose of Amateur Radio Clubs: (a) Recognizing that there are no nobler members of our society than Amateur Radio operators, through our clubs we need to provide a venue for all Amateur Radio operators (Hams) to find relationships, activities, and opportunities to expand upon their knowledge and expertise of Amateur Radio communications so that none will be attracted to the next “shiny” object and desert our ranks. (b) Knowing that our entire hobby is predicated on the permission of our government to continue to exist, we need to continually add to our number New Hams and develop them into active members of our avocation. Although Amateur Radio is not political, we depend on politicians to maintain our status. Politicians are impressed by numbers, and we need to be a constituency that they will pay attention to. Simply put, there are only 2 things clubs really need to do – make new hams and develop them into active and engaged members of our fraternity. In the process, all of the objectives of our “Basis and Purpose” can be met. Now there are lots of ways that clubs can do those 2 things. Whatever your clubs’ activities and programs are, ask yourselves, does this really move one or both of those 2 things forward? Don’t get me wrong, many things do, and that’s what we should be focusing on. Last week I was at the Columbus Hamfest, this week the Cincinnati Hamfest. Both were really good opportunities to find some good flea market deals and talk to some very interesting people. Lots of clubs use their hamfest as a fundraiser. They always appreciate your being there and do their best to make it an enjoyable event! The Ohio Section Newsletter Contest winners were announced last week at the Columbus Hamfest. From John Ross – KD8IDJ: Another great year the Ohio Section Newsletter Contest. A lot of important amateur radio information to club members through their newsletters. Here are the 2022 winners! First Place OH-KY-IN Amateur Radio Society Qfiver Second Place Mount Vernon Amateur Radio Club MVARC Newsletter Third Place Portage County Amateur Radio Society The Radiogram Fourth Place Alliance Amateur Radio Club Zero Beat Honorable Mention Media County Amateur Radio Club News Beacon The judges had some good tips and suggestions for any newsletter. 1. If your newsletter is on the club’s website, make sure it can be accessed easily…and early! A large red-colored “button” on the first page that says NEWSLETTER is a good idea. Make sure it takes them to the latest newsletter not an archive. 2. On the newsletter…LEAD WITH NEWS!!!! Many newsletters start with a list of officers and other administrative information. Move that information to another page. Also helpful, might be a CONTENTS box in the lower right-hand corner. 3. If you still mail your newsletter, consider finding help adding a link to your webpage…if you have a webpage…or exploring ways to help finance a website making all of your information available. 4. Take a look how your newsletter appears on all electronic screens…cellphones, I-Pads, and other screens big and small. You can alter your layout, so your newsletter appears more readable in all formats. 5. Be careful of too many type faces. Try to stick with one typeface for the body of the newsletter and any headlines. Using too many typefaces can make for difficult reading. CONGRATULATIONS to everyone!
DELARANews

Section news

Tom Sly, WB8LCD

I have been “Ranting” about clubs quite a bit lately. I’m going to continue that here because I truly believe that “CLUBS” are what can save Amateur Radio and make sure it exists into the future. But we’ve got some work to do. From the Federal Register Title 47: Telecommunication, in part 97 you will find the rules and regulations that define the Amateur Radio Service. For this conversation we will look at part 97.1 – The Basis and Purpose of Amateur Radio: Subpart A—General Provisions §97.1 Basis and purpose. The rules and regulations in this part are designed to provide an amateur radio service having a fundamental purpose as expressed in the following principles: (a) Recognition and enhancement of the value of the amateur service to the public as a voluntary noncommercial communication service, particularly with respect to providing emergency communications. (b) Continuation and extension of the amateur's proven ability to contribute to the advancement of the radio art. (c) Encouragement and improvement of the amateur service through rules which provide for advancing skills in both the communication and technical phases of the art. (d) Expansion of the existing reservoir within the amateur radio service of trained operators, technicians, and electronics experts. (e) Continuation and extension of the amateur's unique ability to enhance international goodwill. I’m probably going to be accused of committing some sacrilege here, but this is not exactly what we should use as a guideline as to how our clubs should operate! Not that these goals for the Amateur Radio Service will not be met, but the activities of our clubs will lead to the accomplishment of these goals by doing what clubs should have as their objectives. Following are Tom’s General Provisions for the Basis and Purpose of Amateur Radio Clubs: (a) Recognizing that there are no nobler members of our society than Amateur Radio operators, through our clubs we need to provide a venue for all Amateur Radio operators (Hams) to find relationships, activities, and opportunities to expand upon their knowledge and expertise of Amateur Radio communications so that none will be attracted to the next “shiny” object and desert our ranks. (b) Knowing that our entire hobby is predicated on the permission of our government to continue to exist, we need to continually add to our number New Hams and develop them into active members of our avocation. Although Amateur Radio is not political, we depend on politicians to maintain our status. Politicians are impressed by numbers, and we need to be a constituency that they will pay attention to. Simply put, there are only 2 things clubs really need to do – make new hams and develop them into active and engaged members of our fraternity. In the process, all of the objectives of our “Basis and Purpose” can be met. Now there are lots of ways that clubs can do those 2 things. Whatever your clubs’ activities and programs are, ask yourselves, does this really move one or both of those 2 things forward? Don’t get me wrong, many things do, and that’s what we should be focusing on. Last week I was at the Columbus Hamfest, this week the Cincinnati Hamfest. Both were really good opportunities to find some good flea market deals and talk to some very interesting people. Lots of clubs use their hamfest as a fundraiser. They always appreciate your being there and do their best to make it an enjoyable event! The Ohio Section Newsletter Contest winners were announced last week at the Columbus Hamfest. From John Ross – KD8IDJ: Another great year the Ohio Section Newsletter Contest. A lot of important amateur radio information to club members through their newsletters. Here are the 2022 winners! First Place OH-KY-IN Amateur Radio Society Qfiver Second Place Mount Vernon Amateur Radio Club MVARC Newsletter Third Place Portage County Amateur Radio Society The Radiogram Fourth Place Alliance Amateur Radio Club Zero Beat Honorable Mention Media County Amateur Radio Club News Beacon The judges had some good tips and suggestions for any newsletter. 1. If your newsletter is on the club’s website, make sure it can be accessed easily…and early! A large red-colored “button” on the first page that says NEWSLETTER is a good idea. Make sure it takes them to the latest newsletter not an archive. 2. On the newsletter…LEAD WITH NEWS!!!! Many newsletters start with a list of officers and other administrative information. Move that information to another page. Also helpful, might be a CONTENTS box in the lower right-hand corner. 3. If you still mail your newsletter, consider finding help adding a link to your webpage…if you have a webpage…or exploring ways to help finance a website making all of your information available. 4. Take a look how your newsletter appears on all electronic screens…cellphones, I-Pads, and other screens big and small. You can alter your layout, so your newsletter appears more readable in all formats. 5. Be careful of too many type faces. Try to stick with one typeface for the body of the newsletter and any headlines. Using too many typefaces can make for difficult reading. CONGRATULATIONS to everyone!