DELARANEWS

Dan

Dan Romanchik, KB6NU

A youngster gets to talk to the Astronauts

A Broadstairs eight-year-old has chatted with an astronaut aboard the International Space Station and a recording of the conversation will feature on the NASA website. Isabella Payne spoke to Astronaut Kjell Lindgren as the ISS flew overhead last week. The youngster was with dad Matthew who is a license holding amateur radio enthusiast and tutor. He and Isabella are both members of Hilderstone Radio Society. Matthew said: “Isabella has been a member of the radio club ever since she was born and has been playing with the radio since she was six. Because I have the full licence she can sit on my knee and use the radio to speak to people as long as I am controlling it. Everyone at the club can do that. She has been involved in a few radio events, Children On The Air events, and will hopefully go for her own licence soon. Click the space station to listen in - this is sweet! Incidentally, YOU can hear and potentially work the ISS fairly easily! Add a few downlink frequencies to your scan list, and the uplink either as a mom-standard split or even easier, with dual-receive radios, keep the uplink on one side and the downlinks on the other. you will be surprised how often you hear the onboard repeater, and occasionally a live Astronaut operating the station. Check ariss.org for details. The following frequencies are currently used for Amateur Radio ISS contacts (QSOs): Voice and SSTV Downlink: 145.80 (Worldwide) Voice Uplink: 144.49 for ITU Regions 2 and 3 (The Americas, and the Pacific and Southern Asia) VHF Packet Uplink and Downlink: 145.825 (Worldwide) UHF Packet Uplink and Downlink: 437.550 VHF/UHF Repeater Uplink: 145.99 (PL 67 Hz) VHF/UHF Repeater Downlink: 437.80 One operator note- program in 5 plus and 5 minus the downlink frequency - the doppler effect will shift your received frequency a bit higher as it’s heading toward you, then as it passes and starts to move away, the lower frequency will come into play. you don’t need to vary your uplink.
DELARANews

Dan

Dan Romanchik, KB6NU

A youngster gets to talk to the

Astronauts

A Broadstairs eight-year-old has chatted with an astronaut aboard the International Space Station and a recording of the conversation will feature on the NASA website. Isabella Payne spoke to Astronaut Kjell Lindgren as the ISS flew overhead last week. The youngster was with dad Matthew who is a license holding amateur radio enthusiast and tutor. He and Isabella are both members of Hilderstone Radio Society. Matthew said: “Isabella has been a member of the radio club ever since she was born and has been playing with the radio since she was six. Because I have the full licence she can sit on my knee and use the radio to speak to people as long as I am controlling it. Everyone at the club can do that. She has been involved in a few radio events, Children On The Air events, and will hopefully go for her own licence soon. Click the space station to listen in - this is sweet! Incidentally, YOU can hear and potentially work the ISS fairly easily! Add a few downlink frequencies to your scan list, and the uplink either as a mom- standard split or even easier, with dual-receive radios, keep the uplink on one side and the downlinks on the other. you will be surprised how often you hear the onboard repeater, and occasionally a live Astronaut operating the station. Check ariss.org for details. The following frequencies are currently used for Amateur Radio ISS contacts (QSOs): Voice and SSTV Downlink: 145.80 (Worldwide) Voice Uplink: 144.49 for ITU Regions 2 and 3 (The Americas, and the Pacific and Southern Asia) VHF Packet Uplink and Downlink: 145.825 (Worldwide) UHF Packet Uplink and Downlink: 437.550 VHF/UHF Repeater Uplink: 145.99 (PL 67 Hz) VHF/UHF Repeater Downlink: 437.80 One operator note- program in 5 plus and 5 minus the downlink frequency - the doppler effect will shift your received frequency a bit higher as it’s heading toward you, then as it passes and starts to move away, the lower frequency will come into play. you don’t need to vary your uplink.